Author Archives: MoneyforCollegePro

9 Career Fair Tips For College Students

Career Fair Tips For College Students

One of the things college students worry about is getting a job – and not just any kind of job – a job that makes them feel fulfilled. A career fair allows students to find a potential employer or sponsor. It’s like a job interview but for college students and the greatest mistake one could make is to go unprepared. You need to prepare your mind to nail your pitch, but it’s more than that. It comes down to your dressing, your smile, posture, and a whole lot of other things. This article will help you find some of those things you might miss when preparing for a college fair.

Important Career Tips for College Students

  1. Prepare the outfit: Don’t go on a closet destruction spree for the perfect outfit. What you need isn’t a nice outfit; you need smart and professional dressing. Stick with minimal colors, but at the same time, don’t be boring. You need the employers to remember you for something. Keep neat, clean, put-together, and of course, like you have something valuable to offer.
  2. Update your Resume: Everyone learns every day and you might have learned new skills you want to add. Check through your resume to make sure that you have properly and professionally sold yourself the best way possible with all your skills, qualifications, and experience levels. Add some of your accomplishments if you have and make sure that you have enough printed for 10 to 20 employers. If you have ever worked a seasonal job during your gap year, be sure to put it in the resume.
  3. Research on the employers that would be at the fair: If you can, ask about the employers that would be around – what they do, their companies, what they are looking for, the kind of skills they need, and so on. This will make for a great conversation when they begin to engage you in a discussion. However, be careful not to sound like you stalked them online.
  4. Prepare the pitch: Your pitch is like a short elevator speech that is about a minute or two minutes long but captivates a potential employer. See it as an audio resume where you highlight your value to their company. Though this can be slightly hard to figure out, practice as many times as you can and ask your teachers, family, and friends for advice.
  5. Be on time: You might think ‘but the fair doesn’t start till 8’. If you want to land the front seat, you need to be on time. Campus job fairs are always crowded with smart pants and you wouldn’t want the employers meeting with you when they are exhausted.
  6. Be attentive during interviews: Most times, students have already prepared a list of possible questions they’ll be asked during interviews – and though this can be great for practice, it makes some of them give correct answers for a different question. During interviews, listen carefully to the questions, understand them, and ask them to repeat if it’s not clear. Avoid jumping to answers, understand the question first, and give a coordinated and correct response.
  7. Ask questions after: This is what sets you apart from other students at the fair. Asking questions makes the employer feel that you understand his or her company and you are interested in adding value and not just getting a working space. Most times, they remember these questions and put you in mind for a hire.
  8. Ask for ways to stay in touch: Part of asking questions is asking for a business card, an email, or a phone number that you can reach them on. Ask also, for the best times and medium to reach out. Some employers prefer phone calls while others might prefer emails.
  9. Keep in touch: Finally, it’s not enough to ask for the medium, you should also follow up with those you feel were particularly interested in you. Why? You may ask. Most times, (especially if you arrived early), potential employers would have interviewed so many people that you will be almost forgotten. Following up with prospective clients will help you remind in sight.

Conclusion

A career fair can be the most competitive, overwhelming, and stressful part of being a grown-up in college. The worst is that sometimes, you might not even get a potential employer to look your way for a long time while you wait in your stand. However, keep a positive vibe and follow all the tips that have been mentioned above. Just remember to highlight the best things about yourself while you keep a great smile.

What is Dual Enrollment? How does it work?

What is Dual Enrollment

Dual enrollment allows a student in high school to enroll for classes in college at the same time. It helps students save money on college since you’ll be taking lesser courses in the college than the students that waited until after high school. It also helps the student get into the workforce market much sooner. Sometimes, the fee is covered by the state and other times, the student has to pay the fees in full by him or herself. However, there’s more to dual enrollment than what meets the eye. This article entails what dual enrollment is, how it works, and a bonus at the end with information regarding the requirements.

What is Dual Enrollment?

Dual Enrollment is simply what it is – a student enrolling for two classes at the same time. With dual enrollment, a high school student can take college classes and run high school programs at the same time. This allows the student to earn college credit while still in high school. These students end up having to work two schedules which can prove difficult for a few students. Some other students might find it hard to participate fully in both programs which allows them to miss out on the ‘fun’ of schooling.

However, there are some benefits to it. A student that is running a dual enrollment program will earn college credits on time, get a head start on degrees, and graduate much quicker. It also helps to ease the tension and anxiety of the ‘new-world experience’ of college. But how does it work?

How does dual enrollment work?

Since the student is allowed to run two programs at once (high school and college), when a student passes a dual enrollment (or dual credit) class, it counts as a credit for both programs. The kind of classes or what sort of classes are involved depends entirely on the school district. Some schools offer general subjects and courses like Science, Social Studies, Math, English, and likely Humanities.

However, these course works are usually introductory subjects so they are not overly tough for the incoming high schoolers. The courses usually last for a single semester which doesn’t allow the student to be too choked-up with double schooling.

The exams and tests are usually held at the high school either as an online assessment or a physical test. They can also sometimes be held in a local community college and as long as the state requirements are met, there would be no problem.

Dual credit classes are for those that require or are chasing after certain degrees and certifications like Carrer or Technical Education Certificates, Associate’s degree, or a Bachelor’s degree. The grade that ensures a pass during a dual credit program is a C and above (B or A). Also, the credit doesn’t only count during assessments, tests, or exams, They also count during admission processes or whenever the college administrators count credits.

However, you might need to note that though dual credit/enrollment might seem like a good idea, not all states accept these credit types. Out-of-state colleges, for example, or even private colleges are less likely to accept dual enrollment credits so you might need to search in-depth to know what schools and states accept dual credit. That’s why you might need the next section on the requirements for dual enrollment.

Dual Enrollment Requirements

  1. Dual credits are usually awarded or offered to only high school seniors and juniors. The students need to be at least a sophomore or a junior. Only a few schools will allow younger students to participate in their current grades are over-the-top excellent.
  2. If the student is a resident or is schooling in North Carolina, Mississippi, Maine, Alabama, Missouri, or Florida, the student has to have at least a 3.0 GPA to participate in dual credit programs. A student with a lower GPA will be considered unable to balance the two schedules properly.
  3. Students might require a written recommendation and permission letter from the class teacher, subject teacher, principal, coach, or parent as the case may be.
  4. Minimum ACT or SAT scores might also be required.

Conclusion

Dual enrollment is a great way for an outstanding student to get a feel of what college life will look like plus he or she can add up some college credits while at it. It is also great for saving costs. As long as the requirements are met, nothing might be able to stand in the way of getting those degrees and preparing for the workforce market early on.

How Are Private Student Loan Interest Rates Determined?

Student Loan Interest Rates

Only a few students go through the entire school year without collecting a loan of some sort. But that is not the hard part. The challenging part is paying back the loan. However, some students prefer to know how the interest rate will be determined so that calculations and projections can be made. If this sounds like you, then you are in the right place. This article will explain what interest rates are, how they are determined for student loans, and how they affect your loan at the end of the day.

What Are Interest Rates?

Interest is a percentage (fixed or not) of a certain amount, positive or negative – as in the case of debts. When you borrow an amount, or you are loaned money, an interest usually follows and the rate increases with every day that the debt is owed until the loan is paid back in full. For example, if the interest rate of a loan of $1000 is 0.2%, that means that a sum of $2 will be added daily to the total amount you’ll pay back (for example). So that at the end of every month, you have an additional $60 to pay when you pay off your loan.

In reality, the interest rate isn’t that thick but at the same time, you must know that some federal student loans place a fixed rate and it affects the total cost of your monthly payment or loan. However, not all interest rates are fixed. Some are varied – well it is called variable interest rates. Let’s take a look at that for a minute.

Fixed vs Variable Interest Rates

Fixed rates are certain fixed amounts you should pay at the end of the day regardless of how much you loaned or how long it took you to pay back. While this might sound great for those that like to stall on payment – there might be some disadvantages. There are different methods for determining fixed interest rates and it depends on the type of loan, the lender, and maybe the state you are in. However, this type of interest rate still seems to b a better option for those that are running a long-term loan plan.

The variable interest rate is flexible and fluctuating. It can also be tagged ad fluid because it changes with regard to the market index. Therefore your monthly payment might change (increase or decrease) during the time of repayment depending on what the market index says. Over time, the interest rate might become overwhelming or not but it’s not too safe for long-term loaners.

When the federal government grants student loans, the interest rate is usually fixed but when it comes to private lenders, it depends. Some prefer fixed rates while others go for variable interest rates. The type of interest rate you pick is dependent on a lot of things but mostly the term of the loan.

How Are The Rates Determined: Private and Federal Student Loan Interest Rates

Federal student loans are gotten by applying using the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The fixed interest rate is usually based on a 10 year Treasury note rate and it is determined during May. The amount of the interest consists of a percentage attached to the loan type and the status of your education (undergraduate or graduate).

For Private loans, the deal is much different. First, the application varies from company to company and they can be funded by online lenders, credit unions, banks, and so on. The type of interest rate (fixed or variable) is also subject to the company that’s lending out the money. However, they usually work with credit history before giving out loans so that they can ensure that they’ll get their money back. They also look at your income frequency and status and employment history. Some companies check your credit and do a critical evaluation before awarding a loan. All of these they do only to be sure that you will pay back their money – and on time too.

Conclusion

Many things affect a student loan, the lender, the type of interest rate, market factors, rate choice, creditworthiness, and so on. However, the ways to determine the rates sit with what kind of loan it is – a federal student loan or a private one. Federal student loan interest rates are determined more easily and are straightforward while the other needs more documents, checks, and proof that you will pay back on time.

All in all, if you can pay off your student loans early, take the chance and do it!

Benefits of Paying Off Student Loans Early

Benefits of Paying Off Student Loans Early

There are different reasons students collect loans and that’s not a bad idea. The challenge only arises when it is time to pay back. There is a major conflict between whether to pay back now (all at once), little by little, or to pay the entire thing later. However, the choice is not that straightforward. For example, some financial advisors will opine that students should hold back on payment if they don’t have enough saved up or if there are other debts involved. However, this article will show you some important benefits you’ll gather if you close your eyes and pay off your student loan early.

Why You Should Pay Off Student Loan Early

  1. The earlier you pay, the cheaper it is:

Yes, it might look like that $$$ is a little thick at the moment but the sad truth is that it increases over time. For those that might seem confused, this is how it works. A student loan – almost all loan types come with a percentage increase referred to as interest. This interest accrues with a balance (positive or negative). When you owe, it increases with a negative balance and vices versa for when you don’t owe. So the earlier you pay, the easier it would be to pay off the interest too.

  1. It will quickly be out of the list of things to do:

This is a little more straightforward. When you pay off a debt, you’ll have lesser things to worry about. You will also be able to place your money on other more profitable investments like college (or if you are already in college), a university of your choice, a master’s, or even something out of the academic line like a vacation.

  1. Your debt-to-income ratio will improve positively:

A debt-to-income ratio can also be seen as a credit score or ‘improving/worsening your credit’. When you have a good credit score, it means that you have a good history of paying off your debts quickly. This means that lenders (or whatever institution loan money) trust you and would be happy to give you better interest rates next time you need to loan. Having a bad credit score (or increased debt-to-income ratio) means that you usually allow the interest to accumulate too long before paying and so lenders find it hard to trust you with honoring your loan agreement. In the long term, a good credit score will serve you.

  1. You would save more money:

Similar to the first point, when you get rid of student loans on time, you end up saving more money. This is a common mistake students make – they wait till the end of the repayment term before they start making repayments. By this time, not only would you have accumulated too many interest charges, but you’ll also lose a lot of money. But by paying off early (or increasing how much to pay off monthly), you can save hundreds or even thousands in interest charges that you can (again) use for other things.

  1. Financial stress will be eradicated or lessened:

What is financial stress? It’s when the source of your anxiety is lack or insufficiency of money/finances. Waiting till the last moment to pay off your student loan will put financial stress on you no matter how financially stable you are/were before then. It is usually a debt that starts small and ‘payable’ until the interests pile up over time to become this huge debt that’s a pain in the neck. Paying it off while it’s still young will save you financial stress in the future.

Conclusion

Though at first, it might be difficult to pay off loans due to the thoughts that ‘the money isn’t enough or that there are other investments. But one of the worst mistakes to make with debt is thinking that the debt can wait. Yes, it will wait but at the same time, interest charges are accruing waiting for when it will shower you with big-time financial stress. Save yourself the hassle and pay it off while it’s still cheap. You can start slowly as soon as possible and before you know it, it’s all paid off. Good luck!

Traditional VS Roth 401(k): Which Is Better?

Traditional VS Roth 401(k)

We all know how important it is to invest in a retirement savings account with tax advantages. But all the nitty-gritty involved in building your retirement nest egg can make your head spin.

So, if you’ve been struggling to figure out whether a traditional 401(k) is better for you or a Roth 401(k), you’ve come to the right place!

Here’s a concise and clear guide on 401(k), traditional 401(k) and Roth 401(k), and the best option for you between the two.

What Is a 401(k)?

A 401(k) is a tax-advantaged retirement savings plan offered by employers all across America.

When you sign up for a 401(k), you agree to put away a percentage of your paycheck into an investment account. The employer may also agree to match up with this percentage in part or full.

Today, employees have access to two 401(k) plans: traditional and Roth 401(k). The traditional 401(k) was introduced in 1978, whereas the Roth 401(k) was introduced in 2006.

Let’s take a look at the similarities and differences between the two 401(k) investment plans and how they can impact your savings.

Traditional VS Roth 401(k): Similarities

  • Both are retirement savings options.
  • Both have the same contribution limit.
  • Both provide tax-advantaged growth on investment.
  • Both have a maximum annual contribution limit.
  • Contributions to both plans are matched by the employer.
  • Both 401(k) plans have required minimum distributions (RMDs) starting at 72.
  • Both plans offer tax breaks (in the present or future).
  • Both attract early-withdrawal penalties of 10%.
  • Both provide distributions to you and your beneficiaries due to disability or death.

Traditional VS Roth 401(k): Differences

Traditional 401(k)

  • Contributions are made from pre-tax income.
  • You get tax breaks in the present.
  • It reduces your taxable income/current adjusted gross income.
  • Deferred taxes on investment gains.
  • All withdrawals are taxed at the income tax rate in the future.
  • All the money is only taxed when it comes out of your account.
  • State income taxes may be applied.
  • You can start receiving distributions at age 59 ½ regardless of when you started.

Roth 401(k)

  • Contributions are made from after-tax income.
  • No tax breaks in the present.
  • Withdrawals aren’t taxed.
  • Contributions aren’t taxed.
  • Paycheck goes down with consecutive contributions.
  • Growth on contributions is tax-free.
  • You can start receiving distributions at age 59 ½ only if you have held the account for at least 5 years.
  • Employer-matched contributions go into a pre-tax account and are taxed during distribution.

Traditional VS Roth 401(k): Which Is Better?

Select Traditional 401(k) If…

  • You need a little extra cash in the present.
  • You want to save money.
  • You’re in a higher tax bracket at present.
  • You are expecting to earn less in the future.
  • If your employer is matching your traditional 401(k) contributions only.
  • If you plan to move to a state that doesn’t collect income tax in your retirement.
  • If you started after the age of 54 ½ and need to access money at the age of 59 ½.

Bottom Line: If you’re starting to invest in a 401k quite late, then the traditional 401(k) would be the better option for you.

Select the Roth 401(k) If…

  • You are young.
  • You want tax-free growth on investment.
  • You want tax-free withdrawals during your retirement.
  • You are fine with a little less in your paycheck today.
  • You have already signed up for a traditional 401(k).
  • If you are in a lower tax bracket at present and expect to be in a higher tax bracket later on.
  • If you are expecting higher tax rates in the future.

Bottom Line: If watching a chunk of your retirement savings getting taxed is a heavy blow to your heart, then choose the Roth 401(k).

Can You Opt For Both Traditional and Roth 401(k)?

Yes.

You can choose to make contributions to both traditional and Roth 401(k) accounts on a year-by-year basis. This means you can decide how you want to split your contribution in either of the 401(k)s for that year.

Here’s an example:

For the year 2021, your 401(k) contribution is $19,500. Then you can choose to split it into equal halves and contribute $9,750 to both traditional and Roth 401(k) accounts. This limit only applies to the employee’s contribution to the account. Employer contributions aren’t included in the limit.

For those of age 50 or older, there’s the option of making a catch-up contribution to the 401(k) of $6,500.

Contribution Limits

The 401(k) contribution limit for 2021 is $19,500 and the same for 2022 is $20,500.

Final Thoughts

When determining the best retirement savings plan, there will always be some assumptions and predictions involved. There are factors outside of your control that may affect your income, tax brackets, and tax percentages in the future.

If you need a professional opinion, you could always ask a financial or investment expert for advice.

The best option is to carefully assess your current options and go with either of the plans. You’ll end up saving something for your retirement anyway.

10 Ways To Save Money On A Low Income

10 Ways To Save Money On A Low Income

As much as we’d all like to, not everyone makes 7 figures a year, unfortunately. That’s simply the sad reality of most of the working class. The constant battle to make ends meet can greatly impact your saving habits.

While it’s important to make sure your bills are paid and food is put on the table, there’s absolutely no reason for you to put your dreams of buying a house, car, or retiring worry-free on the back burner.

Saving money on a low income doesn’t mean you have to stop living your life to the fullest. It simply means finding a way to make the most out of your money while setting a little aside to contribute towards your future.

Let’s explore some of the best tips for saving money on a low income that won’t feel impossible to do.

10 Ways To Save Money On A Low Income

Anyone who has to deal with a low income knows how far planning ahead can go. That said, if you’re constantly feeling like you’re barely living paycheck to paycheck, it may be time to make a few changes.

1. Set A Budget

Without a set financial plan, you may find your money slipping away from your fingertips more quickly than it should. It’s important to take the time to sit down and think about where your money needs to be spent.

Financial experts like to follow a 50-30-20 rule where 50% of your income is allotted for your needs, 30% on your wants, and the remaining 20% goes into your savings.

This may or may not work for you, so it’s all a matter of building a budget that will help you keep track of your spending.

2. Reduce Your Housing Expenses

Your housing cost is one of your biggest expenses. According to the National Expenditure Survey, consumers spend around $10,080 on housing costs annually.

There are three things you can do to cut back on these expenses:

  • Downsizing to a smaller home or apartment.
  • Moving to a cheaper location.
  • Rent out any extra rooms or space.

3. Handle Your Debts

Trying to repay your debts can take a toll on your monthly budget, but it’s a necessity you can’t ignore. It may be challenging, but eliminating your debt more quickly will free up your money so you can use it on more important things like a home deposit.

4. Think About Your Food Costs

From packing lunches for work to cooking your own meals, there are many ways to cut down on food costs. We don’t mean eating the bare minimum. Instead, you should look into cooking your own meals rather than eating out.

If you want to stick to a budget, you may even find meal planning helpful.

5. Set Up An Automated Transfer

With cash on hand, it can be difficult to keep track of your money after paying the bills. One way to prioritize your savings is by setting up automated transfers each month.

This will allow you to set up your budget without having to worry about your savings and let you focus on your wants and needs depending on what’s left.

6. Find Cheap Ways To Entertain Yourself

Saving on a low income doesn’t mean you have to live a boring life. There are many ways to have fun while living frugally. Here are some suggestions to consider:

  • Take up hiking
  • Practice cooking
  • Take up gardening
  • Watch movies at home
  • Read a book

7. Visit Your Local Library

Libraries offer more than just free books. There are many free resources that they can offer such as:

  • Internet
  • Movies
  • CDs
  • Games

8. Look Into Cash Envelopes

It’s easy to lose track of your budget when all your money is in one place. To keep things organized and give you a clearer view of your spending habits, try the envelope method.

It’s simple — all you need to do is take a few envelopes, label them according to your expenses, and fill them with your allotted budget. And stick to these allotted amounts.

9. Find Affordable Banks

Banking costs are the bane of any low-income earner’s existence. Not only do they riddle you with unnecessary fees, but it can take a huge toll on your budget. To help you save in this area, it’s a good idea to look into fee-free banks.

10. Think About How Much Your Car Costs

If you own a car, then you’re probably spending several hundred dollars on it each month. It’s important to look into ways to minimize these costs, such as:

  • Switch to a cheaper insurance company
  • Try to pay off your car as quickly as you can
  • Scrap the car and bike or commute to work instead
  • Learn about doing minor car repairs at home

Conclusion

Savings not only help you prepare for retirement but also help you reach your dreams and act as a safeguard if you ever get laid off from work unexpectedly. There’s absolutely no reason for you not to save money.

We hope this list has given you an idea of how to save even with a barely manageable income.

What Foods To Buy In Bulk To Save Money And Food Waste

What Foods To Buy In Bulk

One of the smartest ways to save money when it comes to food is to buy it in bulk. Not only will you get large quantities at discounted prices but it will also reduce the need to go grocery shopping too often.

That said, you also need to know what foods can be stored for a longer period. Foods like bread and pastries do not store as well as others. Such items will just end up as food waste, along with the money you’ll be throwing away!

So, to help get you started, here are the top 10 foods you should buy in bulk to save money and minimize food waste.

Top 10 Foods To Buy In Bulk To Save Money And Food Waste

When picking out food to buy in bulk, it’s important to consider three things — how well they keep, how easy they are to store, and how flexible they are when it comes to cooking. This way, you won’t put off using them for longer periods just because you’re tired of the way they taste.

1. Canned Beans

Buying beans in bulk should be a no-brainer. They store well, are easy to use, and are versatile to boot! Canned beans are perfect because you can just open them up straight out of the can and use them. No need to cook or soak them! Plus, they can be used in a variety of dishes from tacos and beans on toast to adding them in pasta and rice dishes!

Average cost per can: $1.79

2. Canned Tomatoes And Tomato Sauce

Tomatoes are another great item to buy in bulk. These versatile and healthy fruits go well on a wide range of foods, including pasta sauces, stews, and soups. You can even use their juice in smoothies and other drinks!

Average cost per can: $1.25

3. Dried Lentils

Lentils are one of the most shelf-stable foods you’ll find in the market. While some studies show that storing these beans may reduce their nutritional value over time, it’s not that significant of a difference.

When stored in ideal conditions, dried lentils can last up to 10 years!

Average cost per pound: $1.56

4. White Rice

Dry white rice can be stored in an airtight container for up to 2 years. Since it doesn’t spoil easily, it makes sense to buy it in bulk. White rice can be used in a variety of dishes from desserts to burritos.

Average cost per pound: $0.71

5. Frozen Berries

Fresh blueberries are among the most expensive products in the market. Other berries like strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries can also cost a pretty penny. Luckily, you can save a few dollars by buying them frozen and in bulk.

While many raise concerns over losing the nutritional content of fresh berries when they’re frozen, it’s not of major concern and certainly not harmful to your health. And according to the USDA, frozen fruit can be safely stored for up to 6 months in the freezer.

 Average cost per pound: $2.04

5. Frozen Vegetables

Vegetables are an essential part of your diet since they’re packed with nutrients your body needs. However, buying them fresh can quickly become expensive. Vegetables also tend to spoil quickly; you might have found yourself unable to use them all up and having to toss most of them in the bin.

But like frozen berries, they can be stored for months. In some cases, frozen vegetables can last up to a year in your freezer.

Average cost per unit: $1.88

6. Honey

A healthier alternative to sugar, honey can be stored for up to 2 years according to the National Honey Board. When stored correctly, it can last for more, but this all varies depending on different conditions.

Average cost per pound: $1.97

7. Coconut Oil

Unlike other vegetable-based oils, coconut oil is more resistant to oxidation. This means it’s less likely to spoil over time. When stored in a cool, dark place, it can last for up to 3 years.

Average cost per pound: $0.46

Conclusion

When you think of buying in bulk to save money, it’s also important to consider food waste and minimize how much food you’re throwing away. Learning how to eat healthily is a very important step in keeping you running at full power your entire life.

A good way to do this is by looking into ideal storage solutions and buying food that is more shelf-stable. We hope this article has helped you learn about the best food to buy in bulk to save money and avoid food waste.

Cheap Car Insurance for Students

Cheap Car Insurance for Students

Car insurance is required in 49 out of 50 US states. When you’re a student, funds are tight and you often find yourself walking a tightrope between your needs and wants. Since cars are often necessary for getting around, you’ll want to find the most cost-effective car insurance for your needs.

This isn’t as easy a task as we’d like since many insurers will often charge students higher premiums. Students are considered relatively inexperienced drivers so the risk of liability is higher meaning pricier insurance rates.

As a student, you’re already juggling expenses for books, food, lodging, and gas as well as other things. To add expensive insurance payments to the mix only complicates an already stretched budget.

How will you deal? Are there more affordable insurance options for students?

The good news is there are car insurance companies that offer more competitive rates. You’ll need to do some in-depth research though since no two insurance companies offer the same rates.

Before signing on the dotted line, it’s a good idea to look at a few offers, check prices, and available discounts for comparison.

Top 3 Car Insurance For Students

1. Geico

Geico offers some of the cheapest car insurance rates to students. It offers low premiums and often has promotional discounts tailored specifically for students. For example, there are discounts for fraternity and sorority members as well as for students actively involved in campus activities.
Geico’s policy is set at an affordable $2,326 for six months of full coverage. These rates vary based on location so you’ll need to get in touch with them for a more exact price.

2. State Farm

State Farm has a long list of auto insurance discounts including reduced rates for students:

  • It offers a generous 25% off for students under 25 with a ‘B’ average or better.
  • New drivers under 25 without accidents and moving violations in the last three years can get a 15% discount
  • If you are a courteous driver, State Farm honors young drivers with safe driver discounts.

Known as the best car insurance in the market for student discounts, State Farm’s premium is around $2,462 for six months of full coverage.

3. Allstate

Allstate is the only car insurance company that has a mobile app called Allstate Mobile. The user-friendly app provides functionalities like policy renewal, claims management, and customer support.

This is a great help for tech-savvy students who may not have the time to visit or call Allstate offices.

Without creating a hole in your pocket, the Allstate policy is around $2,467 to be fully covered for half a year.

Tips for Finding Cheap Car Insurance

To get the best rates for car insurance, keep the following tips in mind:

  • Pay your bill on time
  • Compare car insurance quotes
  • Play around with your coverage
  • Look for car insurance discounts
  • Ask about a no-claims bonus/discount. This is a percentage discount awarded for not filing any car insurance claims during the previous year. It increases with every year that you don’t have accidents or claims.
  • Consider the cost of coverage before buying a car

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Should college students have their own auto insurance policy?

It depends. If you’re a full-time college student, you can be covered by your parents’ car insurance as long as your primary address remains the same as your parents.’ This applies even if you’re attending college out of state.

2. What is an auto insurance premium?

An auto insurance premium is the amount you need to pay at regular intervals to keep your insurance active.

3. When do I need to get auto insurance?

If you own a car, you need to be covered by insurance. Forty-nine out of 50 states require it. In New Hampshire, the exception that doesn’t mandate vehicle insurance, you still have to show proof that you can cover any financial liabilities that may arise from accidents.

Once you have car insurance, you should always carry a copy of your current car insurance policy with you when you drive.

4. How can I avail of the cheapest car insurance?

Research and price comparisons are the only ways for you to find the cheapest car insurance available. You should also ask for discounts from each insurer.

Additionally, you can also ask about the minimum coverage for significantly reduced prices. Before doing so, however, you should see if what is minimally covered is sufficient for your needs and what’s required by the state.

5. What is the insurance rate?

The insurance rate is the amount of money needed to cover losses, expenses, and provide a profit to the insurance company for every vehicle.

Your Takeaway: Responsible Drivers Get the Best Insurance Rates

In the end, responsible and defensive drivers who don’t have any records of accidents and liability will always have a distinct advantage when it comes to insurance premiums. To keep your costs low, be careful and always follow road and safety rules.

5 Reasons for College Students to Choose Co-Living Spaces

co-living spaces for college students

College is an exciting and fun time, but it isn’t without its challenges—accommodations being the first of these. While on-campus housing options make everything simpler—meals, bills, travel convenience, safety, etc.—downsides include budget, style of living, rules, and availability. 

The search for off-campus housing giving you the shivers? Well, it shouldn’t! Dump the apartment hunting and explore co-living.

Here’s why more and more college students are opting for co-living spaces:

1. Most Co-living Spaces Give Each Resident Their Own Room

If you were expecting co-living to be synonymous with flat-sharing, you couldn’t be more wrong. Co-living is about having a personal space as well as a communal or shared space. This is why most co-living spaces will offer student residents their own room and bathroom and a dedicated work or study space.

Co-living spaces also have shared spaces so residents can get acquainted with one another. Almost all co-living spaces are usually fully furnished, so you can happily say goodbye to all the furniture bids you’ve placed with your graduating seniors!

2. Co-living Spaces Provide You With Many Amenities

Co-living spaces are big on amenities—you’ll find everything you need, all under one roof, whether it’s Wi-Fi, laundry services, gyms, media rooms, kitchens, dining spaces, pools, gaming zones, etc. Moreover, as the expenses are split between the residents, co-living offers such amenities at nominal, subsidized prices. An accommodation with dedicated living spaces and a wide variety of amenities at base price—How can anything be better than co-living?

3. Co-living is Cheaper Than Living On Campus Or Renting an Apartment

As young college students with multiple co-curricular and extra-curricular activities to tend to, losing track of the bills that need to be paid for the month is highly probable. While late bills incur late fees, students soon find themselves burdened with additional costs for the month.

With co-living spaces offering to build in every single one of your utilities, including rent, keeping up with your bills and expenses is incredibly easy! That’s not all. Since the cost of amenities and rent is split between residents, college students can live comfortably at a nominal cost. Furthermore, as residents take shared responsibility for maintaining said amenities, no individual expenses are incurred. Co-living is also cheaper than renting an apartment as security deposits aren’t as exuberant.

4. Dormitories Often Have Many Rules, Whilst Co-living Have Little to None

The thing college students dread most is a call from their landlord. Whether it’s the noise or the broken faucet, living under the radar of an authority like a landlord can be quite stressful.

When it comes to dormitories, too, the list of rules is quite extensive—from adhering to mealtime to sticking to a dishwashing schedule, it sucks the freedom right out of you!

However, co-living spaces have little to no rules. Thinking about throwing a little party for the pals later tonight? Go right ahead! No prior permission necessary.

5. Co-living Gives You The Chance to Meet New and Like-minded People

We live in a world where physical socialism drops by the minute. With social media being the primary source of interaction among individuals, co-living spaces are a breath of fresh air as they allow resident students to socialize and build meaningful friendships the old-school way.

The idea of being able to reach out and share allows more engagement and physical interaction among residents. Sure, living with roommates isn’t always smooth sailing with the different schedules, beliefs, and preferences. However, poles attract! Co-living spaces provide you with the opportunity to network alongside like-minded individuals and grow in unison as well.

Why Co-Living?

Although most college students opt for dorms or continue living on campus, off-campus accommodations in the form of co-living spaces offer you a real bang for your buck. When it comes to your budget or your specific requirements, you can do more with co-living spaces than a dorm, for instance. As for social life outside of college, co-living spaces provide ample opportunities for growth and networking outside the classroom as well.

The perfect mix of comfort, affordability, and freedom for a college student, co-living is the future of housing accommodations for the average young adult.

Optimize Your Budget and Make Your Food Last

When you’re trying to save money, every penny counts. However, one of the biggest expenses we all face is food. The cost of goods including food is constantly rising. If we aren’t careful, our food and grocery bills can end up occupying a larger part of our budgets than we intended.

It’s therefore vital to manage our food expenses economically and develop money-saving tactics. Here are some tips and tricks that you can use to cut down on food costs without sacrificing your health.

Prepare Your Own Meals

You can probably guess what the most common culprit of ballooning food expenses is: eating out. If you’re serious about cutting down on your food spend, start preparing more meals at home. When you stop eating out, you’ll significantly cut down on your food bill and eat healthier meals.

If you’re short on time, try a once-a-week meal prep plan and start with simple meals you can whip up in minutes. You can slowly expand your repertoire of dishes when you start feeling more comfortable and confident with cooking.

Make a Meal Plan

Whether it’s an occasional weekend meal plan or a menu for every day of the week, creating a plan beforehand can help you stick to your planned meals and budget. Thinking ahead and making lists can also help you reduce unnecessary expenses when you go to the supermarket.

Rotate Foods, Don’t Waste Them

When you eat the same food day after day, it can end up being monotonous and boring. When there’s no variety in your meal prep and grocery list, there’s a high chance you’ll waste food.

Hence, your best bet is to rotate different types of food and dishes. Make sure to include a variety of veggies, fruits, dairy, grains, and lean protein in your meal routine to make it more interesting and palatable.

Choose Cheaper Proteins

Protein-rich foods like eggs, ground meat, and dried beans are not just cheap and healthy, but also have a longer shelf life. If you add in other non-perishable items like rice, pasta, and oats, you can have a steady supply of quick and nutritious meals. Moreover, buying these food staples in bulk is cost-effective and will save you frequent trips to the grocery.

Use Your Freezer

Cut down on ready-made meals and TV dinners. They offer little nutrition and are heavy on the pocket. Instead, prepare meals in advance, freeze everything that can be frozen, and defrost as needed. You can make large batches of chili, curry, or stew, and divide them into meal-sized portions so they’ll be ready whenever you need a quick meal.

Love Your Leftovers

Knowing how to recycle or repurpose leftovers into different dishes is a valuable skill if you’re looking to cut down on expenses. Identify and learn recipes that are leftover-friendly. Excess ingredients and food like carrots, celery, and rotisserie chicken can all be thrown into a pasta sauce and enjoyed as a new dish.

Start An Aromatic Herb Garden

The joy of preparing meals from ingredients freshly picked from your own garden is unparalleled. Contrary to what you may think, you don’t need a huge space to have a garden. Greens like herbs, cress, and lettuce can be grown on your window sill. Small vegetables like tomatoes, potatoes, and beans can be grown in pots that will easily fit inside your kitchen.

Track Your Expenses

Sometimes we buy food we don’t need out of habit. Tracking our food budget can help prevent this by making us aware and accountable for our expenses. Monitor expenses and your budget to scale back and change previous spending habits.

Shop Smart, Buy Local

Buying locally grown and produced food is fresher, more nutritious, good for the environment, and cheaper. Buying from farmer’s markets and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) Programs also help the local community.

You can join a CSA by paying growers a lump sum at the start of the season. In exchange, you’ll get fresh produce at regular intervals that are cheaper by as much as half the price you pay in groceries.

You can also buy meat at the deli instead of the supermarkets’ meat section. They’re not only cheaper, but they’re fresher too.

Eat Before Going Grocery Shopping

When you visit a grocery store on a hungry stomach, you have a tendency to fill your cart with more food than you need. When you’re full, you’ll be less tempted and be able to shop more objectively.

Beware of Coupons

Coupons, cashback, and new customer discounts are great ways of saving extra money. However, exercise caution before you purchase items on discounts as coupons encourage you to buy more items than you need just because they’re on sale.

Budget-Friendly Habits: Start Small

There are many ways to cut down on food expenses and eat healthier, but they entail creating new habits in place of the old. The best way to adopt these budget-friendly practices is by starting with small steps and gradually adding more to your routine.

Whether it’s preparing your own meals, tracking your expenses, or cutting down on grocery visits, ease into it one habit at a time. You’ll eventually find yourself rewarded with healthier, better meals and have more cash to show for it.